ABOUT

SVWRP

STRUCTURE

LOSS

 

THE SVWRP - WHAT IS IT?

The Slocan Valley Wildfire Resiliency Program (SVWRP) is a wildfire planning initiative being delivered by SIFCo on behalf of the Villages of Slocan, Silverton, and New Denver. The first year of the program is focused on developing a comprehensive long-term strategy to create more fire resilient communities in the Slocan Valley.

The core of the program is guided by the FireSmart disciplines and plays an active role in supporting the long-term planning strategy and delivery.

Following the FireSmart disciplines to mitigate wildfire, planning strategies and services will be delivered for the following areas; education and outreach, emergency planning, vegetation management, cross-training, and interagency cooperation.

Educating and working with community members is key to ensuring wildfire adapted and prepared communities.

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LANDSCAPE LEVEL PLANNING

Landscape Fire Planning and Management is an integrated approach that fully recognizes and considers the risks of wildland fire in resource management decisions at all levels.

 

Landscape-level planning is based on the concepts of landscape ecology (which includes fire), the study of how biota, materials, and energy exist and flow within landscapes.

 

Different strategic options may include fuel reduction, strategic fuel breaks, and the use of different forest types that resist wildfires.

WILDFIRE HISTORY - HOW DID WE GET HERE?

 
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A CHANGING CLIMATE IS INCREASING WILDFIRE INTENSITY

Longer droughts and stalled weather patterns, smaller snowpacks, and less predictable weather patterns are increasing wildfire frequency and intensity.

The changing climate patterns affect the health and composition of the forest; the warmer shorter winters have increased the proliferation of mountain pine beetle contributing to pine forest die-off and prolonged droughts have increased aspen and deciduous tree die-off.

 

This additional stress put on the forests creates higher fuel loads and compromises the health and ability to be resistant to wildfire.

INTERVIEWS WITH WILDFIRE EXPERTS

 

STRUCTURE LOSS - WHY DO HOMES BURN?

Wildfires are a reality for residents of the Slocan Valley and with wildfire comes the risk of structure loss given the current state of our forests. 

It is the aim of the SVWRP to prevent structure loss in the event of a wildfire in our area, and therefore create wildfire resilient communities. 

 

Humanity has now witnessed many devastating wildfire events that have completely destroyed communities and left them having to rebuild their infrastructure from scratch.  We understand how traumatic this experience can be and feel it is important that we take action as a community because structure loss can be preventable. 

There are 3 ways a home can burn during a wildfire event:

1. Direct flame

2. Radiant heat

3. Ember showers

The most common cause of structure loss is the third one on the list, ember showers. Please watch the video on the left for more information on this.

With wildfires come ember showers. If we do not mitigate our homes and communities these ember showers can pose a great threat to our communities. 

During a wildfire embers can travel for kilometers and last for hours.  So even if the wildfire is a distance from your home and you are safe from direct flame and radiant heat, you could still be at risk from embers. 

 

These embers shower your home and collect.  If there are fuels available these embers easily create new spot fires which can travel from fuel load to fuel load and grow and ignite your home.  In most cases when a wildfire event is occuring communities are evacuated and can not return to their home until it is deemed safe and emergency services can become overwhelmed quite quickly.  Doing all we can to prevent these spot fires from occurring is our best hope in protecting our homes and communities.

 
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Another very important step you can take is to have your home assessed by a Local Firesmart Representative.  If you live in Slocan, SIlverton or New Denver SIFCo is offering free assessments.  Contact us for details.

STEP 2

TAKE ACTION - WHAT CAN YOU DO?

STEP 1

A great first step in learning what you can do around your home to help lower the risk of igniton from wildfire, is to download the Firesmart manual by either clicking here or clicking on the image to the left.

This manual offers you a step by step guide of the mitigation steps you can take on your property.

Another very important step you can take is to have your home assessed by a Local Firesmart Representative.  If you live in Slocan, SIlverton or New Denver SIFCo is offering free assessments.  Contact us for details.