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THE SVWRP - WHAT IS IT?

The Slocan Valley Wildfire Resiliency Program (SVWRP) is a wildfire planning initiative being delivered by SIFCo on behalf of the Villages of Slocan, Silverton, and New Denver. The first year of the program is focused on developing a comprehensive long-term strategy to create more fire resilient communities in the Slocan Valley.

The core of the program is guided by the FireSmart disciplines and plays an active role in supporting the long-term planning strategy and delivery.

Following the FireSmart disciplines to mitigate wildfire, planning strategies and services will be delivered for the following areas; education and outreach, emergency planning, vegetation management, cross-training, and interagency cooperation.

Educating and working with community members is key to ensuring wildfire adapted and prepared communities.

WILDFIRE HISTORY - HOW DID WE GET HERE?

 
LANDSCAPE LEVEL PLANNING

Landscape Fire Planning and Management is an integrated approach that fully recognizes and considers the risks of wildland fire in resource management decisions at all levels. Landscape-level planning is based on the concepts of landscape ecology (which includes fire), the study of how biota, materials and energy exist and flow within landscapes. Different strategic options may include: fuel reduction, strategic fuel breaks and use of different forest types that resist wildfires.

Humans are part of the planetary landscape and our impacts on natural patterns are now key factors that influence how landscapes function. As we continue our path towards a more fire adapted community, recognizing and understanding the place that wildfire has within the broader forest management discussion will improve the overall effectiveness of the wildfire reduction mitigation strategies.

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A CHANGING CLIMATE IS INCREASING

WILDFIRE INTENSITY

Longer droughts and stalled weather patterns, smaller snowpacks, and less predictable weather patterns are increasing wildfire frequency and intensity.

The changing climate patterns affect the health and composition of the forest; the warmer shorter winters have increased the proliferation of mountain pine beetle contributing to pine forest die-off and prolonged droughts have increased aspen and deciduous tree die-off.

 

This additional stress on the forest creates higher fuel loads from dead trees and compromises the forest's health and ability to be wildfire resistant.

STRUCTURE LOSS - WHY DO HOMES BURN?

 
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There are three ways that a wildfire can result in structure loss . . . .

 

TAKE ACTION - WHAT CAN YOU DO?

STEP 1

DOWNLOAD THE FIRESMART MANUAL

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STEP 3

MITIGATE YOUR STRUCTURE USING THE FIRESMART PRINCIPALS

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STEP 2

ASSESS YOUR HOME IGNITION ZONES

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STEP 4

CREATE A NON - COMBUSTIBLE ZONE

0 - 1.5M AROUND YOUR HOME.

STEP 5

IDENTIFY AND MITIGATE ZONE 1

1.5M - 10M

STEP 6

IDENTIFY AND MITIGATE ZONE 2

10M - 30M

STEP 7

IDENTIFY AND MITIGATE ZONE 3

30M - 100M

THESE ARE JUST SOME OF THE STEPS YOU CAN TAKE TO REDUCE THE RISK OF STRUCTURE LOSS DURING A WILDFIRE.  FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.FIRESMART.CA

SIFCo FUEL TREATMENTS - WHAT IS SIFCo DOING?

As part of our Strategic Landscape Level Wildfire Protection Plan for the Slocan Valley (SVLLWPP) we are implementing five different forest treatment types in order to lower the risk of Lanscape Level Wildfires in the Slocan Valley.  Through using a combination of the five treatments we aim to create Lanscape level fuel breaks throughout the Valley in areas that have been indentified as high risk.  Below we have listed informational videos about how we created our plan and what each treatment involves.